Japanese Food Artist Hand-Carves Complex and Sophisticated Patterns Into Fruit and Vegetables

Inspired by the nation’s traditional art of decorative garnishing (known as mukimono) and Thai fruit carving, Japanese chef and food artist Takehiro Kishimoto sculpts intricate motifs and patterns into fruit and vegetables. Rendered using a sharp blade, Kishimoto meticulously carves his designs into avocados, apples, carrots, broccoli, and more. In some cases, he turns fresh produce into elegant flowers, while other pieces of fruit and veggies are etched with geometric patterns inspired by traditional Japanese textiles. Each edible masterpiece showcases the artist’s incredible talent and patience; some pieces can take several hours to complete! Scroll down to see some of Kishimotoss food creations, and find more on his Instagram.

When he’s not cooking them, Japanese chef and food artist Takehiro Kishimoto is turning fruits and vegetables into intricately carved sculptures too beautiful to eat.

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Kishimoto combines the centuries-old art of Thai fruit carving with the Japanese art of Mukimono to decorate apples, carrots, broccoli, and broad beans with geometric patterns and elaborate designs.

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The art of Thai fruit carving was originally used to decorate the tables of the royal family.

And often involved carving elaborate 3D motifs (such as flowers) into the soft flesh of apples, watermelons, and more.

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The Japanese art of mukimono is hundreds of years old.

And involves creating decorative garnishes for meals.

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By merging both traditions, Kishimoto has developed his own hybrid style.

Where fresh produce takes on the motifs of both cultures.

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The precision easily could be mistaken for digital photo manipulation were it not for the process videos that Kishimoto shares on his Instagram.

He also writes that he hopes the Thai carving tradition will spread around the world.

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via [mymodernmet]